Goodread

Can you believe 2018 is almost over.  It has been pretty good year to me, and I’m sure it’s because I’ve made an effort to be more of an optimist. On a smaller scale, it’s probably also due to coffee and all the greats books I read  on travels. But maybe I’m projecting. You tell me.

Last year a lot of my books were self-help books. Helped me cope with changes and personal growth. Here are some of my favorite books I read on 2018. 


1. Kahlil Gibran’s The  Prophet –  I love love love this book written by one of my favorite author of all time.
The Prophet, is one of the most beloved classics. A collection of poetic essays that are philosophical, spiritual, and, above all, inspirational. Short but invaluable book of philosophy and encouragement It is filled with wisdom. Despite the religious implication
“You give but little when you give of your possessions.
It is when you give of yourself that you truly give.” 

  1. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood:  I have loved this book since the first time I read it. It is horrifying, suspenseful, introspective, and just close enough to believable to be truly scary. If you only know the Republic of Gilead from the Hulu show (not the same), read this book.
  2. Becoming – I’m so thrilled to add Becoming to my list! A powerful, surprising and moving book as well as refreshingly candid that I think will be deeply inspirational to many. 


  3. Children of blood and bone by Tomi Adeyemi THE HYPE IS REAL!
    I always prefer to decide for myself if the new overhyped YA book is worth it… and I’m happy to say that this new Fantasy book totally was!

    This is genuinely the greatest debut fantasy novel, greatest fantasy novel in general that I have read in a very long time. Initially, I was TERRIFIED to read. The combination of its size and an epic high fantasy novel was very daunting to me, but I am so happy I picked it up. I cannot possibly recommend it enough.

  4. The Sun Does Shine How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row – am not sure where to put my feelings after finishing this book. I am appalled, sad but also filled with admiration for this inncent man on death row for over thirty years, who managed to retain hope and love. He hung on, didn’t give up.
    Before I read this book, I didn’t have an opinion on the death penalty, but now I do!!!

  5. Letters to a Young Muslim: is a compilation of letters from a father to his son. It is full of wisdom and thoughtful reflections on faith, culture and society.  Love that this book encourages the readers to celebrate individuality whilst recognizing it is our shared humanity that can bring us together.

  6. Good fantasy novel Melina Marchetta never fails to write heart-wrenching relationships and tragedy and pain, of which this was a stellar example. I loved and cried over my favorite characters and the hardships and obstacles that they encountered.
             Froi of the Exiles (Lumatere Chronicles, #2)
             Quintana of Charyn (Lumatere Chronicles, #3)

  7. All The Light We Cannot See – follows the complex arcs of two such invisible lines through the lives of Werner Pfennig, an orphan boy in pre-World War II Germany and Marie-Laure Leblanc, a blind girl living in Paris with her father.
    The writing was incredible, the descriptions so vivid. It did a superb job of showing the reader how the characters felt through their actions, rather than telling.



  8. An immersive story of an interesting and well thought out land with lovable and hate-able characters. Just what I needed. Perfect mini escape from the real world, into magic ❤

    • Assassin’s Apprentice (Farseer Trilogy, #1)
    • Royal Assassin (Farseer Trilogy, #2)
    • Assassin’s Quest (Farseer Trilogy, #3) 

  9. Ruby by cynthia bond –  It rips your soul out of your body with it’s strong, dark presence. You beg to be released from the grips of this story. 

  10. Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood – If you’re going to read this book, definitely listen to the audio version.
    Feels like he is sitting down with you and telling you his life story. Not only that, but you get to learn quite a bit about pre- and post-Apartheid South Africa from the perspective of someone who hypothetically shouldn’t exist.
    Noah’s mother is black and his father is white, and when he was born any mixed-race relationships were illegal.

 

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